College 101: The Pros and Cons of Greek Life on Campus

When we picture fraternities and sororities, a lot of us picture what we see in the movies. Late night parties, drinking, and stereotypes galore. But there are a lot of benefits to outweigh any of the perceived cons.

Whether Hollywood left you promising yourself not to join Greek Life or you’ve been dreaming of living in a fraternity house since childhood, take a look at our list before you decide.

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Karonica Davidson
College Admissions Explained: Breaking Down the SAT’s New Adversity Score

Among some of the most selective institutions, low-income students have a low representation--a fact that’s “relatively unchanged from 20 years ago.” The adversity score has been created perhaps in response to this achievement gap and in an effort to support students who are beating all odds by applying to college in spite of their circumstances.

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FAQs: Everything You Need to Know About the National Honor Society for High School Students

If you have a GPA of 3.0 or above, you may be eligible for the National Honor Society (NHS). The NHS is a great way to stand out on your college application, especially if you take advantage of all that the program has to offer. Here’s more information about the NHS, including how to apply for the National Honor Society Scholarship Program.

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Q&A: Will a High SAT Score Counter a Low GPA?

A: Your GPA is just one factor among a dozen or so colleges use to evaluate applicants. In many ways, I view course rigor and other academic indicators as important, if not more important, than having an incredibly high GPA (3.75+). Still, GPA does matter in the long run.

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College Admissions 101: Introducing 10 of the Top Undergraduate Engineering Programs (+ Acceptance Rates for Class of 2023)

Are you thinking about studying engineering? From mechanical engineering to computer engineering, there are plenty of paths to explore. Plus, the field of engineering is expected to continue growing in the next decade, so you’d be looking at a strong job outlook for the future.

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The 5 Do’s and Don'ts for 9th and 10th Graders Who Want to Get a Leg up in the College Admissions Process

It’s still early. You don’t need to create your dream college list or polish up your resume just yet. In your 9th and 10th grade year, you should be focusing on your studies, getting involved in extracurricular activities, and setting up healthy habits to carry you through the next few years.

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Want to Streamline Your College Admissions Process? Start with Your Local College Fair

As helpful as it is to research online and browse college websites, nothing beats speaking face to face with a college representative. College fairs are a great way to get to know different colleges and start to understand what you prioritize in a school.

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Q&A: Should my college admissions essay relate to my intended major?

Depends. If your application is for graduate school where you generally already have a field of study chosen, or for direct admission into an undergrad college like X University’s College of Education, you should definitely tie your main application essay into your future major or focus area.

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SAT Introduces ‘Adversity Score’ to Capture Social and Economic Background

David Coleman, CEO of The College Board, recently announced plans to assign an adversity score to every student who takes the SAT in an effort to capture their social and economic background.

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The Ultimate Guide to Prepping for College: 9th and 10th Grade Edition

As a 9th or 10th grader, it can feel like it’s too early in the game to start worrying about the actual process of applying to college. And you’re right. Your goal in the first two years of high school should really be to lay the foundation for success--focus on doing your best in school and finding the extracurricular activities that you enjoy--so you can develop your interests and grow as a student.

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Karonica Davidson
Studying for the GRE? Here are 8 Free Resources to Get You Started

You might have thought the days of standardized testing would be long gone after high school. Low and behold, the truth is, colleges still use standardized tests, mainly the GRE (Graduate Record Examinations), to measure whether you’re prepared for a school beyond undergrad (i.e. graduate programs) because unlike grading standards which can vary from college to college, national tests are more predictable of academic preparedness.

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Q&A: How Long Should My College Application Essay Be?

A college admissions essays, commonly referred to as a personal statement or statement of purpose, can range in length from 350 words to several pages which means, for some applications, you have limited space to describe your experiences, achievements, and goals.

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Why Your Extracurricular Activities Matter (in College Admissions and in Life)

Like the name implies, extracurriculars are the things you do outside of your normal curriculum. In other words, an extracurricular is any organized group activity or hobby that is an extra to what you do in your studies.

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Q&A: Why do college acceptance rates keep dropping each year?

The experts say that admissions rates (i.e. the percentage of applicants who get offers of admission) are falling at top colleges because prospective students are applying to more schools than they used to, while the number of available spots hasn’t really picked up.

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Class of 2023 Breakdown: Ivy League Admissions Rates

This admissions cycle, based on the schools who have shared their admissions data so far, Ivy League admissions rates have seemingly decreased across the board.

Not every school shares its admissions rate, but we’ll compiled the data that’s publically available to give you a glimpse of the admissions data for the Class of 2023:

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Q&A: Can I talk about a mental illness on my college applications as a reason for a dip in my grades?

As an on-again, off-again admissions reader, I’ve always been trained to take into account extenuating circumstances like an illness (in whatever form) or death in the family when evaluating an applicant’s profile.

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